Lady Gaga, Marketing Genius?

Lady Gaga isn’t shy about much anything.  Her sexuality, her body, her style and even her desire to, as Missy Elliot would say, “make more paper.”  It was probably R&B/Rap music that first popularized product placement in their music videos, typically showing off a particular car or alcohol.  Though, in these videos, more often than not, the placement was more for the rapper than it was for the company behind the product.

In Lady Gaga and Beyonce’s latest video, Telephone, I counted something like fifteen product placements and I think I might have missed a few like a Coors Light spot that appeared a few times during a dance sequence.  Check out the screenshots for an illustration.

(Diet Coke, Chanel, DOOM , GISM – Anarchy&Violence, Monster Heartbeats by Lady Gaga, LG cell phone, VirginMobile, HP, Plenty of Fish, Monster Beats by Dre, Polaroid, Kraft Miracle Whip, Wonder Bread, Kill Bill Vol 1, Chevrolet SS Truck)

See if you can find more than I did.

Leave your finds in the comments, would love to see what I missed!

I can’t decide if Lady Gaga is a genius or a case example of tasteless, superfluous, obnoxious marketing.  So far this 9:33 minute video has gotten 17,000,000 views on YouTube and many of the placements happen more than once.  It adds up to a minimum 25,000,000 product placements as of this posting.  That is insane.

Any guesses on how effective it might be?  Do product placements like this bother you?  Did you notice them?  Do you think it takes away from the artist with products conspicuously appearing in videos like this or is this just the way things are going anymore?

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2 thoughts on “Lady Gaga, Marketing Genius?

  1. I think it’s anything but tasteless and superfluous. Her decision to include them is a part of her performance. They’re juxtaposed with the fake products, so whilst she’s capitalising she’s also being ironically self-reflexive, and recognizing that she IS a part of an industry…to a point. As with her other videos it partly serves as a commentary on the nature of the pop machine and those who buy into it.

    And as with the song speaking towards a sense of suffocation, and the prison aspect of the video emphasising this, the ‘excessive’ product placement links our consumerism to a claustrophobic feeling of endless commodification and consumption.

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